Outdoor Trainer

Great athletes know that mental focus is as much a part of training and skill as physical prowess. Outdoor Fitness makes mental focus and acuity training a cornerstone of its program.
 

Flexibility training should be a part of each workout. Your warm up and cool down are prime times to concentrate on flexibility.   Becoming more flexible aids performance, prevents injury, increases circulation, lengthens tight muscles and removes waste from your system. It’s important to warm up before you stretch, so that you slowly raise your heart rate, by which you’ll increase circulation and oxygenation of muscles, speed up nerve impulses, warm and lubricate muscles, ligaments and joints.

Use a “One Spot Warm up” for those time when you aren’t able to walk or jog for a warm up. For the cardio phase of the warm up use a step, curb or berm for steps and lateral lifts. After 5-8 minutes, move walk it out, then move onto flexibility, high knees and your workout.  

If you can sneak out for 10 minutes to a local park—or your backyard—this total body workout will reward you with a great muscle strengthening session.
 
Quickie 2: Total Body Tree Workout     10 minutes
 
Perform each exercise for 60-90 seconds per side.

Works: Core, glutes, hamstrings, balance, proprioception
Props: Tree, post, wall, boulder
 
Starting Position: This exercise has you facing a tree, fence or post that’s about 3-4 feet away. Keeping your hips squared with your shoulders, bend over until your back is parallel to the ground, extend your arms to hold onto the tree and lift your right leg off the ground.
 

The Tree Sit exercise is an updated version of that classic ski-conditioning exercise, the “wall sit.” It’s usually done within the confines of large gymnasiums with wood floors and beige walls, but here I’ve added a much more interesting prop—the tree. In addition to the tree’s tactile nature, I also like the metaphor of gaining strength and power from the tree. Plus, while the classic wall sit only strengthens the quads, my version strengthens and tones the quads (in a big way), it also works the deep muscles of the core and abdominals, and shoulders.

The “Palm-to-Palm” Pull-up is a much easier version of the classic pull-up.
 
Works: Latissimus Dorsi,the large “pulling” muscles of your back -- trapezius, rhomboids, deltoids, biceps
Props: Tree limb or monkey bar
    
 
 

The reverse lunge helps you gain strength, especially in your quadriceps. It will also rapidly improve your balance and spatial awareness in the ever-changing outdoor environment.
 
Works: Hamstrings, Glutes, Quadriceps, Balance
 
Props: Flat Ground
 
Starting Position: Start in the athletic stance with your hands on your hips, chest open, eyes forward.
 

Lunges are a staple in your outdoor fitness program because you can do them on a variety of terrain. Once you are comfortable with the basic forward lunge you can progress by moving along grassy knolls and sandbars, up stairs, ramps, and hills. You can also incorporate fun props like stumps, curbs, and flat rocks for step lunges.
 
Works: Glutes, Hamstrings, Quadriceps, Core Stability
 
Props:  Flat Ground
 
Starting Position: Start in the Athletic Stance, with your hands on your hips, ribs lifted, chest open, and eyes forward
 

The wider stance is preferred for its greater control on uneven terrain and to target the inner thighs.
 
Works: Glutes, Hamstrings, Quadriceps, Adductors, and Balance
 
Props:  Flat Ground
 

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