Outdoor Trainer

The Bad News:  Injuries can happen. Aches, muscle fatigue and soreness are part of life for active people and those involved in athletic endeavors.
 
The Good News:  Most injuries are preventable, and are often a result of overtraining and repetitive stress.
 
Overtraining
Overtraining symptoms bear much resemblance to chronic fatigue syndrome; body aches, tiredness and feeling flat or uninterested in training. The expression often used to sum up overtraining injuries is "too much, too soon.” Another one is "too far, too fast."

Turn your runs (and walks) into a full-body blasting adventure! Follow these simple steps to increase your fitness without increasing time spent on the trail.
 
I just came down off the mountain. Clothes drenched. Fully fatigued. Happy! What did I do? I hit the Coastal Trail on Mt Tamalpais for a trail run. Well, not your average trail run, I call it the 60:10 (sometimes I call it the 30:10). The 60:10 includes sixty minutes of cardio, and 10 strength/toning exercises; however, not the kind of exercises you'd expect!

You've heard it said before:  Thoughts are things. The impact of our mental and emotional selves on our physical selves cannot be overestimated.

The leaves are falling and soon enough, so will the snow.  Now is the time to prep for your favorite fall and winter activities.  *(From an article I wrote for Athleta chi)

Remember how quick and agile you were as a child?  You ran flat out on the playground, darting and dodging the other kids in games of tag.  You were having fun, but you were also building valuable sports skills.

Life is NOT a linear event!  For better results - mix it up.
 
The simple truth about fitness is this:  Exercise that can be done in an outdoor location, or site, that includes hilly or mountainous trails, a grassy city or suburban park, a sandy beach, can and will better your performance. By utilizing a variety of terrain, you will learn a new degree of body awareness and train your body to move in a variety of ways.

Too far too fast—overtraining and injury
Overtraining syndrome is the most common cause of injury and physical ailments. In a rush to accomplish too much too soon, people often do themselves—and their fitness goals—real harm. Play it smart, and you stay healthy, make steady progress, and enjoy your exercise uninterrupted by injury and fatigue. Overdo things, and you risk a host of injuries, including shin splints, stress fractures, ankle sprains, knee and lower back pain, and foot pain. 
 
Learn the Signs

Tree Sit
Works: Quadriceps, core abdominals, shoulders, mental focus, environmental integration
Props: Tree with a strong base, light post, wall or mailbox

The Tree Sit exercise is an updated version of that classic ski-conditioning exercise, the “wall sit.” It’s usually done within the confines of large gymnasiums with wood floors and beige walls, but here I’ve added a much more interesting prop—the tree.

Hey, is that you sweating up a storm on the treadmill? That’s fine if you just want to keep the pounds off and maintain an average level of fitness, but if you want to get truly fit and kick butt at your favorite sports, you’ll need more. Athletic training, serious athletic training—requires rigorous and disciplined physical and mental preparation.

Cardiovascular Training - Using Rate of Perceived Exertion (RPE)
 

RPE is a simple and effective method of monitoring your heart rate. It is a useful tool for monitoring the perceived level of muscular, cardiovascular and psychological fatigue. Whether used with or without a heart rate monitor, the RPE offers a correlation between your perception or “intuition” of your physical and mental output, and your actual heart rate.
 

Setting up an RPE during a workout

This simple RPE scale goes from 1 to 10—1 being a very weak (easy) effort, and 10 being maximum effort.  The RPE scale can easily be used in correlation with the Heart Rate Training Zones.

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