Outdoor Trainer

From the original article written by Tina Vindum for Athleta Chi. 
 
It’s the first nice day in more than a week. After days and days of rain, people on the street seem to be less stressed — smiling more, interacting more, and making eye contact. What is it about being outdoors—especially on a nice day?
 
There’s Power Out There!
Mounting research shows the profound effect that fresh air, plants, trees and natural outdoor elements have on our health and well-being.

If you start every workout with a warm up for your body and mind - you will find that your workouts become easier, more enjoyable AND you'll take your fitness to a new level.
 
Every workout should begin with a five- to ten-minute warm-up. A warm-up is your time to limber up your body—and your mind—in preparation for the workout to come. It can be as simple as a walk or a jog.

Short on time? Our "Quickie Workouts" pack a lot of activity into very little time—providing strength, flexibility and cardiovascular benefits in just a few minutes. These are the workouts you turn to when you think, “I’m way too busy today to exercise.” You can slip any of these workouts into a spare 10 minutes. Trust us, putting in that 10 minutes really does make a difference. It’s a whole lot better for your mind and body than doing nothing at all.
 

Sure, we all want great looking abs, but have you ever stopped to think about what your abdominals do?
 
The muscles of your abs or “core” help you with good posture. And every movement you make, from sitting, squatting, bending, twisting, reaching, walking and running, stems from your core. A strong core is not only a key ingredient for washboard abs, it’s critical in preventing injuries, especially in the lower back.
 
What exactly is the "Core"?

The Bad News:  Injuries can happen. Aches, muscle fatigue and soreness are part of life for active people and those involved in athletic endeavors.
 
The Good News:  Most injuries are preventable, and are often a result of overtraining and repetitive stress.
 
Overtraining
Overtraining symptoms bear much resemblance to chronic fatigue syndrome; body aches, tiredness and feeling flat or uninterested in training. The expression often used to sum up overtraining injuries is "too much, too soon.” Another one is "too far, too fast."

Turn your runs (and walks) into a full-body blasting adventure! Follow these simple steps to increase your fitness without increasing time spent on the trail.
 
I just came down off the mountain. Clothes drenched. Fully fatigued. Happy! What did I do? I hit the Coastal Trail on Mt Tamalpais for a trail run. Well, not your average trail run, I call it the 60:10 (sometimes I call it the 30:10). The 60:10 includes sixty minutes of cardio, and 10 strength/toning exercises; however, not the kind of exercises you'd expect!

You've heard it said before:  Thoughts are things. The impact of our mental and emotional selves on our physical selves cannot be overestimated.

The leaves are falling and soon enough, so will the snow.  Now is the time to prep for your favorite fall and winter activities.  *(From an article I wrote for Athleta chi)

Remember how quick and agile you were as a child?  You ran flat out on the playground, darting and dodging the other kids in games of tag.  You were having fun, but you were also building valuable sports skills.

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